Choice Corporate Guano

Is it really a corporate nightmare out there for so many who have the displeasure of working at one of these producers of the mundane, or is it just that it’s so damn cold at the office/warehouse that real human beings find it difficult to work in winter weather conditions – indoors –  at the corporate slave factory?

An employee at the Amazon fulfillment center in Plainfield (Indiana) is alleging that the facility hasn’t had any heat since Thanksgiving. – via Fox59.com

That Amazon sucks in the extreme when it comes to its treatment of its bottom-tier employees, you know, the ones who do the actual work, is or should be well-known.

Think Your Job Sucks?  Try Working in an Amazon Warehouse – via vice.com

or

Inside Amazon: Wrestling Big Ideas in a Bruising Workplace – via nytimes.com

The company is conducting an experiment in how far it can push
white-collar workers to get them to achieve its ever-expanding ambitions.

drew-hays-206414How nice – conducting an “experiment” on its workers.  And there’s so many more examples of how Amazon sucks it boggles the mind that anyone would work for such a hose bag of a company.  After all, we’re told the economy is boooooooming and that jobs are dangling off tree limbs. No, it’s not that jobs are dangling off tree limbs as our government would have us believe, it’s that so few of them are available and the likes of working at Amazon is a depressing necessity. (How many good paying American manufacturing jobs have been shipped overseas? 5 million since 2000.)

 

Amazon is in high demand as an employer. Last month, crowds lined up outside Amazon’s Robbinsville fulfillment center to land one of 1,500 open positions at the company’s four New Jersey warehouses. The hiring event was part of the company’s larger Amazon Jobs Day, in which it hired 50,000 people nationwide.

Amazon announced last week its plans to create 2,000 new jobs in New York City and open a Manhattan office in 2018. Earlier this month, Amazon revealed it was searching for a second headquarters in North America, where it will employ another 50,000 workers. – thestreet.com

Yet once under the golden parachute for employees making less than $12 an hour, things at Amazon aren’t quite so rosy:

Amazon Warehouse Employees’ Message to Jeff Bezos – We Are Not Robotsthestreet.com

Amazon.com Inc. (AMZN – Get Report) has mastered convenience, fast shipping and exceptional customer service and, in doing so, some of its warehouse workers say the e-commerce behemoth has made their lives hell.

On Sept. 20, the Huffington Post U.K. reported that some workers at an Amazon fulfillment center in Rugeley, England, take home less than the minimum wage, despite working 10-hour shifts, after paying a daily €8 ($9.53) “bus benefit” to one of the e-tailer’s third-party partners. To be sure, Amazon said employees can choose to commute to work however they please.

While fulfillment center workers in the U.S. are paid around $11 an hour or higher, according to Glassdoor, well above the national minimum wage of $7.25, the hours are still long; the work, strenuous, and the expectations, according to some, unrealistic.

And how do the company blowhards explain the lack of heat for the past month and a half:

In a statement, Amazon spokeswoman Shevaun Brown said, “Amazon is replacing two heating units in our Plainfield fulfillment center, one which is scheduled for completion by end-of-day tomorrow and the other by the end of the week. The temperature across the majority of our facility ranges between 64-70˚F with one low spot of 58˚F. The safety and well-being of employees is our number one priority and we are monitoring the situation closely to ensure comfortable working conditions.” – via Fox59.com

tomas-listiak-29689
Life Among Lizards Is Such A Bummer!

The last line is such choice corporate guano:  “the safety and well-being of employees is our number one priority and we are monitoring the situation closely to ensure comfortable working condition.”  Yeah Bub, that explains why you’ve allowed conditions to deteriorate in a facility for the past month and a half to where there is little to no heat.

 

 

Whether it’s Amazon or some other corporate monstrosity  – they all speak the “good-speak” but rarely deliver anything more than a pound of horseshit each day for workers to sludge through.

But it all works out well for Jeff Bezos, Amazon’s CEO:

In the last year alone, Bezos made $19.3 billion.

That equals out to about $52 million per day, over $2 million per hour, and $36,000 a minute, or close to the average millennial salary. – via businessinsider.com

There is an avenue around all this, to plant some seeds of change – stop buying needless shyte and when there is a need for necessary shyte, buy local. How much more pleasant must it be to work for a local company that actually provides its workers with the basics in order to do their jobs – heat in the winter.

For a pleasantly concise article on the benefits of buying local, eating local and going local, more can be read here.

Tonight’s musical offering to bring joy, if only for a few moments:

W. A. Mozart: Sinfonie C-Dur KV 551 ~ “Jupiter” ~  3rd & 4th Movements ~ Nikolaus Harnoncourt/Concentus Musicus Wien

Photo credit (front page):  http://www.unsplash.com/@cbarbalis

Photo credit:  http://www.unsplash.com/@drew_hays

Photo credit: http://www.unsplahs.com/@tomexx

One comment

  1. Let’s get that minimum wage raised — it’ll add “flow” to the economy and curb inequality. Excess profits and accumulated wealth via worker exploitation is not meritorious! The misuse of capitalist power is easy, not a sign of business skill.

    Liked by 1 person

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