Gifts from the Young

“I have a defect of energy myself but not a lack of patience. I can wait on myself indefinitely.” – Flannery O’Connor – The Habit of Being

Mary Flannery O’Connor (March 25, 1925 – August 3, 1964) was an American novelist, short story writer and essayist. She wrote two novels and thirty-two short stories, as well as a number of reviews and commentaries.

She was a Southern writer who often wrote in a sardonic Southern Gothic style and relied heavily on regional settings and supposedly grotesque characters, often in violent situations. The unsentimental acceptance or rejection of the limitations or imperfection or difference of these characters (whether attributed to disability, race, criminality, religion or sanity) typically underpins the drama.[2]

Her writing reflected her Roman Catholic faith and frequently examined questions of morality and ethics. Her posthumously compiled Complete Stories won the 1972 U.S. National Book Award for Fiction and has been the subject of enduring praise. – via wikipedia.org

“I am one of the laymen who RESIST the congregation yapping out the Mass in English & my reason beside neurotic fear of change, anxiety and laziness is that I do not like the raw sound of the human voice in unison unless it is under the discipline of music… – Flannery O’Connor – The Habit of Being

“I have been in the hospital and my activities cut down upon. Midwestern trips are contraindicated for the present, so I intend to sit quietly and write me some stories.  If it is necessary to conserve energy, I may buy an electric typewriter. Perhaps then my stories will electrify the general reader; or electrocute him.” – Flannery O’Connor – The Habit of Being

“I don’t deserve any credit for turning the other cheek as my tongue is always in it.” 
― Flannery O’Connor, The Habit of Being

Ms. O’Connor died at the age 39

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Franz Peter Schubert  – 31 January 1797 – 19 November 1828) was an Austrian composer of the late Classical and early Romantic eras. Despite his short lifetime, Schubert left behind a vast oeuvre, including more than 600 secular vocal works (mainly Lieder), seven complete symphoniessacred musicoperasincidental music and a large body of piano and chamber music. His major works include the Piano Quintet in A major, D. 667 (Trout Quintet), the Symphony No. 8 in B minor, D. 759 (Unfinished Symphony), the three last piano sonatas (D. 958–960), the opera Fierrabras (D. 796), the incidental music to the play Rosamunde (D. 797), and the song cycles Die schöne Müllerin (D. 795) and Winterreise (D. 911). – via wikipedia.org

“You believe happiness to be derived from the place in which once you have been happy, but in truth it is centered in ourselves.”  – Franz Schubert

Schubert died at the age of 31

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Tonight’s musical offering:

Schubert: Symphony No. 5 – hr-Sinfonieorchester – Frankfurt Radio Symphony – Andrés Orozco-Estrada, Conductor

Photo credit: http://www.unsplash.com/@nikhita

7 comments

  1. I echo the above comments!

    This quote really spoke to me, it brought back ancient memories:

    “I am one of the laymen who RESIST the congregation yapping out the Mass in English & my reason beside neurotic fear of change, anxiety and laziness is that I do not like the raw sound of the human voice in unison unless it is under the discipline of music… – Flannery O’Connor – The Habit of Being

    I was once a Catholic. And the artist in me had fallen in love with the grand theatrical nature of the mass IN LATIN. When the mass was changed to English, the mass became merely an exercise in ‘going to church on Sunday morning’. English is such a pedestrian, ugly language! And yet, set to music, even English can be beautiful.

    Music, the proof that there is something greater than our selves, there is a creator, and he/she/it is an artist!

    Liked by 1 person

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